Linux /etc file
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 Config File
 Example and Explanation
/etc/modules.conf
 This file contains a list of devices in the system available to the Service Console. Usually the devices allocated solely to VMs, but physically existing on the system are also shown here in the commented-out ("#") lines. This is an important file for root and administrators.
/etc/fstab
This file defines the local and remote filesystems which are mounted at ESX Server boot.
/etc/rc.d/rc.local
This file is for server local customisations required at the server bootup. Potential additions to this file are public/shared vmfs mounts.
/etc/syslog.conf This file configures what things are logged and where. Some examples are given below:
*.crit     /dev/tty12
This example logs all log items at level "crit" (critical) or higher to the virtual terminal at tty12. You can see this log by pressing [Alt]-[F12] on the console.
*.=err     /dev/tty11
This example logs all log items at exactly level "err" (error) to the virtual terminal at tty11. You can see this log by pressing [Alt]-[F11] on the console.
*.=warning     /dev/tty10
This example logs all log items at exactly level "warning" to the virtual terminal at tty10. You can see this log by pressing [Alt]-[F10] on the console.
*.*     192.168.31.3
This example forwards everything (all syslog entries) to another (central) syslog server. Pay attention to that server's security.
/etc/logrotate.conf
This is the main configuration file for log file rotation control daemon. It defines the defaults for log file rotation, log file compression, and time to keep the old log files. Processing the contents of /etc/logrotate.d/ directory is also defined here.
/etc/logrotate.d/
This directory contains instructions service by service for log file rotation, log file compression, and time to keep the old log files. For the three vmk* files, raise "250k" to "4096k", and enable compression.
/etc/inittab
Here you can change the amount of virtual terminals available on the Service Console. Default is 6, but you can go up to 9. I always go :-)
/etc/bashrc
The system default $PS1 is defined here. It is a good idea to change "\W" to "\w" here to always see the full path while logged on the Service Console. This is one of my favourites.
/etc/profile.d/colorls.sh
Command "ls" is aliased to "ls --colortty" here. Many admins don't like this colouring. You can comment-out ("#") this line. I always do this one, too.
/etc/ssh/
This directory contains all the SSH daemon configuration files, public and public keys. The defaults are both secure and flexible and rarely need any changing.
/etc/xinetd.conf
This is the main and defaults setting configuration file for xinet daemon. Processing the contents of /etc/xinetd.d/ directory is also defined here.
/etc/xinetd.d/
This directory contains instructions service by service for if and how to start the service. Of the services here, vmware-authd, wu-ftpd, and telnet are most interesting to us. Two of the most interesting parameter lines are "bind =" and "only_from =", which allows limiting service usage.
/etc/ntp.conf
This file configures the NTP daemon. Usable public NTP servers in Finland are ntp1.funet.fi, and ntp2.funet.fi. Remember to change the service to autostart at runlevel 3.
/etc/vmware/
This directory contains the most important vmkernel configuration files.
 
/etc/init.d/
This directory contains the actual start-up scripts.
/etc/rc3.d/
This directory contains the K(ill) and S(tart) scripts for the default runlevel 3. The services starting with "S" are started on this runlevel, and the services Starting with "K" are killed, i.e. not started..

 

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